What is drift diving?

Drift diving is a specialized form of boat diving allowing you to drift with the underwater currents during your entire dive. The boat is never anchored or moored and follows the group of divers the entire time. Drift diving allows you to:

 

·         Enjoy the dive more because you don’t have to swim against the current

·         Cover and see a large area in a short time

·         Use the current to move you in the direction you want to go

 

There are several forms of drift diving, and like all specialty forms of diving, require orientation and training from someone who knows the procedures and techniques used in the area you’ll be diving. The different types of drift diving are: float drift and live boat drift.

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Graham Casden

Graham Casden is the Executive officer from Ocean First Divers in Colorado. He was first certified in Belize in 1999 and became a DM in 2003 and OWSI in March 2005.

If you thinking diving is not very popular in Colorado, think again.  As Graham told me, “There are more certified divers per capita in Colorado than any other state.”

Graham graciously agreed to be a photographer for DivingInDepth.com and spent time with us on a short interview.

Contact: www.oceanfirstdivers.com

The pictures …

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Intermediate Free Diver

Intermediate free diving courses are geared toward competent and comfortable free divers in safety and problem solving, proper technique, training, and equipment. Thorough training on the physics and physiology of free diving, as well as mental preparation is also apart of this training. The course also covers static and dynamic apnea development and training. This course teaches you to dive to a depth of 66 feet (20 m).

Steven Anderson

Steven’s interest in underwater photography began in 1975, while living in Miami, Florida, where he was certified as an NASDS Advanced Open Water Diver. He has since expanded his diving education and now holds certifications for PADI Rescue, Enriched Air and Underwater Photography. He has been fortunate enough to travel  around the world and visit the many destinations that many divers and non divers dream of. His travels have taken him to locations such as Australia,  Belize,  and Grand Cayman, to name a few. Steven’s first camera setup was an Ikelite housing for an instamatic camera and he used natural light as his light source. In 1975, camera equipment was not as advanced as it is today. He now uses two different camera setups. The first digital setup is the DC200 and strobe made by Sea Life and the other is the DC500 with two digital strobes also made by Sea life. Steven often uses a wide angle lense and enjoys the big look which is a result of its use. He enjoys reading and learning from others who have chosen diving and underwater photography as a hobby and as a profession. Steven and his wife, Anne and two children, Kaitlyn and Connor live in Brentwood, Tennessee. His hobbies include saltwater aquaria, computers, travel, working on his photography, and reading his large collection of diving magazines. Many afternoons are spent looking at the thousands of photos which he taken and sharing diving experiences with friends. When asked “ Where is his favorite spot”? Steven’s reply is “They are all great and each location has it’s own claim to fame.”



Getting Started in Underwater Photography

Photo: Brian Dombrowski
Photo: Brian Dombrowski

It’s fair to claim people share one common motivation for becoming certified scuba divers: The underwater world is full of amazing things to see. Living tropical coral reefs, shipwrecks laden with historical artifacts, and caverns with ancient geological formations offer unique and exciting visual experiences to those choosing to explore them as divers.

With so much to see underwater, it only seems natural for divers to consider some form of underwater photography sometime during their diving career. Photos and video are great ways to preserve, relive, and share a diving experience with others, whether they be divers or not.

A decision to begin underwater photography must go beyond just an interest in taking pictures underwater. Here are some things to consider.

Diving Skills

Foremost, one needs to first evaluate their skills as a diver. Being a safe and sufficiently confident diver is mandatory. Superior buoyancy control is a must. Performing underwater photography requires a diver to multitask. That is, be able to safely dive and control buoyancy while simultaneously composing and taking pictures. Being a safe diver is your first responsibility. Learn how to master your buoyancy control first. If you’re ready to multitask as a photographer underwater, your buoyancy should be not only controlled but nearly second nature.

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