Ice Diving Overview

Photo: Pete Nawrocky

Some people may ask why you would ever want to dive in 32 degree Fahrenheit water under a sheet of ice. There are several reasons why divers descend into the frigid water and explore below a sheet of ice with a hole cut in it.

One of the reasons is the clarity of the water. With reduced sunlight, lack of movement, and the temperature of the water all combine to create some of the clearest water that can be found. The clarity of the water attracts photographers and videographers.

Another reason why you might want to take up ice diving is because of where you live. If you live in the north where lakes freeze every year and traveling to warmer, tropical locations is not in the budget, taking up ice diving can be a great way to get in the water in the winter without having to travel great distances.
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Cave Diving for the Silver Screen

by Andreas W. Matthes

Cave diving in Romania is something not offered all the time and when friend, Underwater cave cinematographer and photographer Wes Skiles of Karst Production was asking me some years back during a NSS-CDS cave diving convention in Lake City, Florida if I like to go cave diving in Romania naturally I was curious and it turned out to be quite a cave diving experience indeed.
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Pete Nawrocky

Pete started diving in 1971 exploring the calm, balmy water off of Long Island NY. His interest in photography started in 1976. The equipment available to him was a Minolta SRT 201 in an Ikelite housing with a simarly housed Vivitar 283 flash. “I started photpgraphy to help explain to my parents why I was spending so much time in the water. Long Island NY is a great place for wreck diving and since I wasn’t traveling to the islands, I used what was available.” Pete specialized in NE wrecks and animals and coupled with his speaking ability found himself on the lecture circuit in 1983. An interest in cave diving led to photography in the same environment and eventually working for Dive Rite. His articles and photos are internationally published in a variety of media










World Conservation Organizations

Divers around the world can help to protect the oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, and springs they dive in by supporting these organizations as well as practicing environmentally safe diving activities. Without your support and dedication, our diving environment may be destroyed for future generations and keep us from diving the places we love. Get involved today!  Below are many organizations for you to get involved with:

Oceana campaigns to protect and restore the world’s oceans. Our teams of marine scientists, economists, lawyers and advocates win specific and concrete policy changes to reduce pollution and to prevent the irreversible collapse of fish populations, marine mammals and other sea life. Global in scope and dedicated to conservation, Oceana has campaigners based in North America (Washington, DC; Juneau, AK; Portland, OR; Los Angeles, CA), Europe (Madrid, Spain; Brussels, Belgium) and South America (Santiago, Chile).  More than 300,000 members and e-activists in over 150 countries have already joined Oceana. For more information, please visit www.Oceana.org

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is the definition of spearfishing?

Spearfishing is the act of using a device, such as a speargun, pole spear, or Hawaiian sling to impale a fish underwater and then bring it back to the surface. Fish are generally speared for food, just like deer hunting or any other kind of hunting.

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