Cameras

Our Camera section will get you on your way to understanding the camera, film, sensors, and lenses. Without an understanding of how things work, it’s difficult to anticipate shortcomings or problems and deal with them either before or after they come up.

Focusing the Camera

Manual focus, auto-focus and focus-lock are the basic choices facing the photographer underwater. Each has its uses. Each has some disadvantages.

Manual focus comes in two basic forms, SLR manual focus and range finder focusing. Both types rely on the photographer to set the focus properly. Most people are familiar with the SLR camera’s manual focus. Look through the viewfinder, twist the lens barrel, make the image sharper or fuzzier, line up the edges of the image in the focus target ring/area of the viewfinder, and take the picture! It’s a pretty simple way to get things done.
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Uchben Bel Ha – Mexico

by Sergio Granucci

A new cave to explore just 5 minutes from my house…

Over the past years, the Labnaha exploration team has explored more than 80 cenotes north of Playa del Carmen in the state of Quintana Roo, Mexico.   In this area, a great number of cenotes are still waiting to be discovered and explored.

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Basic Open Water

Scuba diving training involves taking a course from a training agency such as SDI, NAUI, or PADI.

Basic open water scuba diving training is a process of going through classroom lectures and practical exercises and making multiple dives in a pool environment and then in the open water. Once you successfully complete the classroom portion, pass your exam, and complete all of the pool and open water session requirements, you then become a certified diver. Your instructor will provide you with a temporary card until the training agency you certified under sends you your permanent card. You’re then ready to begin your diving adventure.

Once you complete your open water certification, you can move on to an advanced level certification.

When you begin pursuing getting your diving certification, there are a number of questions you may have and there are a number of questions you should ask your dive shop or instructor. See FAQs for some of these questions.

Jeff Hawes


I started diving back in the mid 70s, while attending the University of Minnesota. It was after moving to Oregon in the mid 90s where the water was saltier and even colder, where I really became enamored with the sport. I could be found every weekend splitting time between assisting with new students, spearfishing, and underwater photography. While in the Pacific Northwest, I spent time divemastering aboard the 116-foot live-aboard Nautilus Explorer in British Columbia and expanding my underwater experiences.

Back in the corporate world, numerous opportunities for travel came with my job, and I was able to bring my dive gear around the world several times. I would always pack my dive and photo gear and as a result, I have enjoyed diving in many rather diverse locations. Sweden, Malaysia, Solomon Islands, Cabo, Bonaire, The Channel Islands, Coz, and BC to name just a few. I have often been asked where my favorite diving is. Anyone that knows me will tell you that I always try to find what makes a dive site most unique and interesting and strive to enjoy the site for what it has to offer. That way, they can all be great. How can I begin to compare the wonders of the Cenotes, to the Kelp forests of the Pacific, or the massive schools of circles barracuda found in the Solomons?  Treasure them All!

With my wife looking for warmer waters, we finally settled in the Palm Beach Area of Florida and can be found photographing the extremely diverse undersea realm this area has to offer.