Steve May

Underwater photography is a natural when you love both diving and photography, but it didn’t quite start out that way. I started diving in 1970 while stationed in California in the Air Force. After about 10 years, I was getting bored with spearfishing and “look-see” diving and looking for something new to do. My Dad had made a housing for a Kodak point and shoot camera that used a flashcube. So my interest in underwater photography started with zero training, a small Plexiglas homemade housing, and a camera that had the dubious feature of using the on-camera flash for the first four shots. For the rest of the 24 exposures, it was all very blue natural light.

Now, twenty plus years after that introduction to underwater photography, I have better cameras, better housings, strobes, and a lot more training and experience over the years. I currently have a Nikon D70 (digital camera) in an Aquatica housing, as well as a Nikonos V and Nikon F4 (film camera) in an Aquatica housing, as well as a variety of lenses from the digital 10.5mm fisheye to the 105mm Macro. I use the Aquatica housings because they have a 300-foot depth rating, and that let’s me take the camera to the deep wrecks that are one of my favorite photo subjects. The history, mystique, and sea life surrounding each wreck is unique.

Diver at 1AXXX, Dry Tortugas

Horse-Eye Jacks, Long Cay, Belize

L Tower Goliath Grouper

Red Frogfish, Half Moon Cay, Belize