Recreational Training

Recreational wreck diving is classified as diving the exterior of a wreck, meaning that you don’t penetrate or go inside the wreck. Recreational wreck diving is defined as any dive on a wreck or object that is at a maximum depth of 130 fsw and is conducted within the normal no-decompression diving limits.

Photo: Steve May

Recreational wreck diving training prepares you for planning and conducting wreck dives within the established recreational diving limitations. Wreck diving training involves taking a course or series of courses from a training agency such as SDI/TDI, NAUI, PADI, IANTD, or GUE. Your training involves learning about the potential hazards of wreck diving, such as possible disorientation, sharp metal edges or objects, and entanglement hazards created by rigging, nets, and fishing line. It also teaches you about the use of line reels, air management, safety procedures, and proper techniques for exploring wrecks. Wreck diving training also covers the location of wrecks, sources of information, search methods, navigation, legal aspects, artifacts, salvage, and archaeology.

Your in water training consists of conducting up to four wreck dives over a couple of days. During your in water training, you’ll develop the skill and experience needed to safely plan and explore wrecks.