John Bulik

In November 1998 when John Bulik was on his first dive in the Red Sea, the unique beauty of the life found underwater immediately took him in. He immediately knew that he had to capture the undersea realm on film. Underwater photography has since grown to be quite a passion for John as many will attest.  John’s scuba travels have taken him to the Red Sea, Belize, Bonaire, Cayman Islands, the Great Barrier Reef, Papua New Guinea, Thailand, British Columbia, Honduras, the Channel Islands along with several closer destinations. “I am fortunate to have been able to visit a variety of dive locations around the planet and photograph some of the incredible underwater life. I hope you enjoy my images and I hope to have many more for you in the coming years.”

John is a film shooter using Nikon F100s in SeaCam Housings with Ikelite strobes as well as his trusty Nikonos V. John’s images are featured in his gallery located in Gulfport, Mississippi, a small display is in the Ocean Springs Mississippi Public Library and another is at the Underwater Phantaseas Dive Shop in Lakewood Colorado. His work has been displayed in several galleries in the Denver area as well at Denver’s aquarium. Seven of his images have been awarded prizes, including Grand Prize and People’s Choice in major competitions.

John is a Master Scuba Diver and a member of the Colorado Underwater Photo Society John recently created a website to showcase his photography. The website currently has several hundred images and John will continue adding to it. Go to www.JohnBulikImages.com.

John’s home is in Wheat Ridge, Colorado and he has a Real Estate Investment and Construction Business in Gulfport, Mississippi.

Keep Reading

Where are the fish?

by David Miner

Before you can hit the water and start shooting fish, you have to know where to find them and learn their habitats and hideouts. You also need to be aware of the local regulations and laws concerning where and when you can spearfish. Every area and state has different regulations, and it is your job to know what they are. Marine officers don’t except ignorance as an excuse for breaking the local spearfishing laws.

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World Conservation Organizations

Divers around the world can help to protect the oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, and springs they dive in by supporting these organizations as well as practicing environmentally safe diving activities. Without your support and dedication, our diving environment may be destroyed for future generations and keep us from diving the places we love. Get involved today!  Below are many organizations for you to get involved with:

Oceana campaigns to protect and restore the world’s oceans. Our teams of marine scientists, economists, lawyers and advocates win specific and concrete policy changes to reduce pollution and to prevent the irreversible collapse of fish populations, marine mammals and other sea life. Global in scope and dedicated to conservation, Oceana has campaigners based in North America (Washington, DC; Juneau, AK; Portland, OR; Los Angeles, CA), Europe (Madrid, Spain; Brussels, Belgium) and South America (Santiago, Chile).  More than 300,000 members and e-activists in over 150 countries have already joined Oceana. For more information, please visit www.Oceana.org

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Why Marine Conservation Should be an Important Part of All Dive Training Courses

by David Miner

Diving is a multi-million dollar business with money being spent on dive training, dive equipment, and dive travel by people wanting to dive on reefs around the world. Reefs are prolific habitats for thousands of species of marine life and have called these reefs home for millions of years. People travel thousands of miles and spend thousands of dollars to be able to dive on a reef and experience the richness and beauty a reef dive provides. In a poll conducted by Divingindepth.com last month on where people dive the most, the “ocean” was checked the most, meaning that most people dive in the ocean and mostly on some type of reef structure, whether artificial or natural.

Notice some of the tips of the coral are white – This is a result of the coral
bleaching (dying) from sea temperatures being too high

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Spearfishing Regulations

Spearing is defined as “the catching or taking of a fish by bowhunting, gigging, spearfishing, or any device used to capture a fish by piercing its body. Spearing does not include the catching or taking of a fish by a hook with hook and line gear or by snagging (snatch hooking).” The use of powerheads, bangsticks, and rebreathers remains prohibited.

Each U.S. state has specific regulations for spearfishing. To find out about spearfishing regulations in your state, do a web search for the following:

State + Spearfishing + Regulations

For Florida regulations, click here.

For general fishing regulations for every state, click here.

For outside the U.S., do a web search for the following:

Country + Spearfishing + Regulations