Deep Diving Training Frequently Asked Questions

Where can you get deep diving training?

A number of training organizations offer different types and levels of deep diving training. Training organizations such as, IANTD, GUE, NAUI, PADI, and TDI all offer deep diving training. If you are looking for technical deep diving training, finding a dive shop in your area with technical instructors may be difficult. Typically, only dive shops that categorize themselves as “technical” shops offer this type of training. You may have to travel out of your area to find a dive shop or instructor.

How much does deep diving training cost?

Recreational level courses cost around $100 to $200. Extended range and decompression procedures courses are $200 or more. Trimix courses range from $500 to $800+. These courses assume that you have all of your gear, which means gear is not included in the course price. Check with your training agency and instructor for detailed costs and breakdowns.

How long does the training take to complete?

Recreational advanced or deep diver courses require around two days to complete and require four dives. Extended range and decompression procedures courses require two days to complete and require four dives. Trimix courses can take up to five days to complete. Many hours of classroom work as well as four to six dives must be completed. Each training organization has different requirements and time-to-complete can vary. Check with your training agency and instructor for a detailed time schedule for the class you are interested in taking.

How long does the certification last?

Certification in deep diving, trimix, extended range, and decompression procedures never expires. There is no yearly requirements or payments to keep your certification current. If you haven’t been deep diving or used mixed gas in a year or more, it’s recommended that you go through refresher training.

What do you learn in deep diving training courses?

Recreational deep diving courses provide you with the knowledge and skills to plan and make deep dives while minimizing risks and avoiding the need for stage decompression. Courses include purpose, problems, hazards, planning, preparation, equipment (additions and modifications), air supplies, personnel, techniques, gas management, emergency procedures (including location and transportation to a hyperbaric chamber) and depth limits for recreational diving. Decompression procedures are to include nitrogen narcosis and decompression sickness, history of decompression, concepts, use of dive computers, definition of terms, problems, principles and techniques. Complete coverage of Repetitive Dive Tables, work sheets, problem solutions, exceptions and dive planning are also to be included. Altitude diving, flying after diving and hyperbaric chamber access and operation shall be included, as well as other short- and long-term deep diving hazards.

Extended range courses and decompression procedures courses provide the training and experience to competently dive to depths not exceeding 180 fsw. The student uses staged-decompression techniques and EANx mixtures and oxygen for decompression. The objective of this course is to train you in the proper techniques, gas planning and management, equipment requirements and hazards of deep diving to depths not exceeding 180 fsw.

Entry level or beginning trimix courses provide the training required to competently and safely utilize breathing gasses containing helium for dives that require staged decompression, utilizing nitrox and/or oxygen mixtures during decompression to a maximum depth of 200 or 225 fsw (60 or 68 msw).

Advanced level trimix courses provide the training required to competently and safely utilize breathing gasses containing helium for dives that require staged decompression, utilizing nitrox and/or oxygen mixtures during decompression to a maximum depth of 300 fsw (91 msw).