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What is drift diving?

Drift diving is a specialized form of boat diving allowing you to drift with the underwater currents during your entire dive. The boat is never anchored or moored and follows the group of divers the entire time. Drift diving allows you to:

 

·         Enjoy the dive more because you don’t have to swim against the current

·         Cover and see a large area in a short time

·         Use the current to move you in the direction you want to go

 

There are several forms of drift diving, and like all specialty forms of diving, require orientation and training from someone who knows the procedures and techniques used in the area you’ll be diving. The different types of drift diving are: float drift and live boat drift.

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The Art of Diving – Buoyancy Control

by David Miner

Diving is as much a sport as skiing, golf, or running. It’s not routinely considered an “athletic” sport, but it is a sport nonetheless. Participating in any type of sporting event is not automatic; it’s not as easy as just purchasing the equipment you need, paying some participation fees, and off you go. Playing and participating in sports requires training, learning, and practicing. Scuba diving is no exception.

Swimming in a horizontal position just above the reef requires good buoyancy control

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Mating Manta Rays Caught on Tape

Rangiroa, French Polynesia

Text and photos by Peter Schneider

Rangiroa, this is the name of the place I call my home…at least since I moved here five years ago. It is the second biggest atoll in the world and the biggest one in French Polynesia. Its name, “huge sky,” describes accurately the phenomena when on a windless day the smooth surface of the lagoon melts with the sky. But there is more Rangiroa is famous for. It’s the abundance of pelagic fish, especially sharks…great hammerheads, silvertips, and hundreds of grey reef sharks. Filmmakers from all over the world make the long journey to the midst of the Pacific Ocean for them…or better to take good, clear images of them. Howard Hall, Jean-Michel Cousteau, Luc Besson, and Jean-Jacques Mantello just to name a few.

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